zwei Roboter-Arme mit schwarzen Flaggen
© The Forsythe Company, SKD , Foto: David Brandt
In order to minimise the spread of the coronavirus all museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden remain closed until 20 April 2020.
In order to minimise the spread of the coronavirus all museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden remain closed until 20 April 2020.

William Forsythe. Black Flags

In the ‘white cube’ of the Kunsthalle in the Lipsiusbau, two industrial robots wave enormous black flags. Accompanied by the operating noise of the robots, their continuous movements leave spectators without a place to rest their gaze, removing any steady reference point in the space. The waving flags translate the digital algorithm that controls the robots into a series of gestural movements in space that appear controlled, unpredictable, weightless, and measured at one and the same time.

  • DATES 27/11/2014—11/01/2015

Film

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William Forsythe. Black Flags
William Forsythe. Black Flags

text1

“This work is viscerally intimidating, yet mesmerizing, creepy and wonderful in spite of the obvious classical patterning strategies.” (William Forsythe)

text2

Also on display, besides the installation in the large hall, are two video works by Forsythe. “Bookmaking” (2008) has been re-edited for the purposes of this exhibition. A wall of monitors features film sequences, cut in rapid succession, that show Forsythe as he tries to print a book with his own body.

zwei Roboter-Arme mit schwarzen Fahnen
© The Forsythe Company, SKD, Foto: David Brandt
William Forsythe, Black Flags, 2014 Programming: Sven Thöne, Technical Realisation: Max Schubert, Producer: Julian Gabriel Richter

text3

“Like the robots, the structural framework is deliberately counterpointed, although in the film my body gets into a somewhat pathetic, but intentionally disorganized mess. This physical frailty stands in stark contrast to the indestructible quality of the robots.” (William Forsythe)

text4

In the latest video work by William Forsythe, we see strawberries being immersed over and over by a jet of water. In contrast to the recognizable choreographic positions in the other two works, this video piece depicts a clearly defined organization instigated by other means.

zwei Roboter-Arme mit schwarzen Flaggen
© The Forsythe Company, SKD , Foto: David Brandt
William Forsythe, Black Flags, 2014 Programming: Sven Thöne, Technical Realisation: Max Schubert, Producer: Julian Gabriel Richter

text5

„The evidence of pattern, and the observer’s anticipation of emergent structure makes for a slightly absurd lecture in the pleasures of choreographic apprehension.” (William Forsythe)

text6

Choreographer and artist William Forsythe (b. in 1949 in New York City) started his career in classical ballet. He went on to revolutionize the idea and practice of dance, creating interactive pieces that repeatedly blur the boundaries between classical choreography, theatre, performance, film, and choreographed objects. Citing René Magritte, Forsythe states that ‘An object is not so possessed by its own name that one could not find another or better one.’

eine schwarze Flagge mit der Aufschrift "Black Flags"
© Surface, Jörg Baumann
William Forsythe, Black Flags

Sponsoren

in cooperation with: The Forsythe Company

funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation

with kind support: Kuka

weitere Ausstellungen

Further Exhibitions
05.07.2016 —14.08.2016
Ansicht des Lichthofs des Albertinum
18.03.2017 —25.06.2017

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im Kunsthalle im Lipsiusbau

Porzellanhund zwischen zwei Stühlen
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